Friday, May 31, 2013

Day 151: Adventures in Wonderland

I have been remiss in my storytelling duties in a number of ways in the last day. Well, firstly look at the time. It's tomorrow and I haven't done today's blog yet. I'm loving this early morning thing—it's a six forty-five kind of a start this morning, the sun already up, but this can't be relied on and is technically late and keeping you waiting. Secondly, no cocktail photo. What! Don't be a hundred percent alarmed, there were cocktails. It's just—and don't mistake this for a complaint—they were all in plastic glasses due to being purchased water-side in the pool bar, and didn't look picturesque. I was hanging out for the 'pretty' one, but then I didn't feel like any more. I promise to take photos of all of them today and then at least we have something. Beauty is in the eye, etc, etc, and it is not for me to judge if you will like the picture of the cocktail or not on the basis of its plastic glass. But the most serious breach of my obligation to you, my reading audience, is that I did nothing story-worthy all day. I've absolutely nothing to tell you.

List_Addict               Irene

In an attempt to make it appear adventuresome, here is my day emphasised. Breakfast, that most essential of meals, was a delight fit for the beautiful brides of kings. Silky juices from godly fruits sweetened and prepared the mouth for succulent charcuteried meats prepared by the hands of artisans and exotic birds eggs collected from high mountain coops at dawn. Crafted pastries as delicate as the passing touch of a hummingbird accompanied creamy coffee reminiscent of the Equadorian plains. Yeah, it was quite nice. You could even get donuts hot out of the oil with chocolate and vanilla sauce, I didn't. Buffet breakfast is an exercise in control and decision making in its finest form. Suitably energised we began a trek that would last all day—the search for the rare and elusive set of sunbeds where both are adequately covered by shade as the sun makes its own pilgrimage of daily discovery. It is a battle of epic wills, but pinkness and our eternal shuffling of books, i-Pads, half-empty plastic cocktail glasses and swathes of towels from spot to spot possibly meant the sun was the victor in that battle. Two other major battles raged through the day. Well, three. There was the battle for my attention between my books (a much reduced electronic reading pile of eleven) and the boy's penchant for finding annoying songs on his i-pod to play for me. Then there was the badminton battle, V—— versus me and us versus the heat, played, much to the amusement of several passers-by, on the Incan-like playing field at the front of the resort. And lastly, the ongoing and currently equally pitched battle for billiards domination. I do feel bad that one of my victories is only due to the immediate potting of the black ball on the break. After such an enormous day I was actually quite exhausted. May try to take it a little easier today (tomorrow for the purposes of continuity).


The Outfit
Top: Op-shopped
Skirt: Primark


The Holiday Photo

Cocktail: Cabana Boy, The Plum Bob Bar; white alcohol of some sort, muddled Thai apples and basil, some sort of topper, mmmm, good memory recall there
Steampunk: zigzag path to the pool, over the koi pond


Photographer de Jour: V——


Who wore it better?

Sharing the Friday love with:



and

Lena B, Actually

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Day 150: Watching the Dawn

Wonderful things, like lotuses, often come from not such fabulous circumstances. Because I worked night shift, had half an hour sleep, took Lollii down to the coast for her hols, slept two more hours, flew to Thailand with a four or five hour extremely broken sleep, made it to the hotel, walked around this new-to-us beach area of Nai Yang and had a swim (so, in other words, slept about ten hours in fifty), I ended up with the most intense migraine. I then slept all last night from about seven and it means that now, at five a.m, I am out on my balcony watching Phuket Island wake up. Watching and listening. It is a cacophony out here with all the birds and insects waking with the light. And, despite slathering myself in stinky stuff and still being mossie-bit fifteen times already, it is stunning. I don't get to see this time of the day that often—not this side of sleeping at any rate.

List_Addict               Irene

There hasn't been a great chance to explore the place we are staying yet. We have managed to find two pools, a pool bar, the exit to the beach and the pool table, but there is lots more to discover I am sure. On information I garnered from a neighbour's recent visit, Nai Yang beach is a quieter beach than the usual suspects (Patong, Karon, Kata), but still with lots of local places to eat and drink and shop and massage. And it is only a few minutes away from the airport, which is adjacent to the water park, which is one of V——'s favourite holiday activities, so we thought we would try it. I can't recall where our neighbour stayed, but it may have been here too. It seems like one of the nicest options in the area, right near the beach and wackily different from many Thai resorts. It is called the Indigo Pearl. I'm loving the steam punk feel that they have created as homage (please pronounce that with a j—homaj—I always think its more sophisticated that way) to Phuket's tin mining heritage. I just love industrial art. Here are some of the other things I love so far: a deep amazing bath on our balcony; feather pillows; an industrial sized pool table; a rope-pulled barge over to one of the restaurants; a dress code. I'll share what else I find with you.


The Outfit
Shirt: Op-shopped
Dress: Primark


The Holiday Photo

This holiday, the holiday photo will feature a cocktail a day and a steam punk feature of the hotel a day.
Cocktail: Pink Mojito, The Beach Club; rum, muddled mint and lime, grenadine, sugar and soda water
Steampunk: that aforementioned bath on the balcony


Photographer de Jour: V——


Who wore it better?

Doing the link-in love-in today with:

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Day 149: Lost in a Sea of Glass and Tin

'Step up and play, each machine seemed to say, as I walked round and round the penny arcade.' Ahhhhhhh! Cannot get it out of my head. Is it karma because I dobbed it in, as ammunition against the boy, to a friend at work who he was harassing with 'Motor Finance Wizard says yes' and 'My little red quote' and 'Boojay, Boojay ... Budget love, Budget'? Probably. These things have the potential to not end well. In order to try and loosen its hold on your brain, you need to come up with more and more nocuous options as usurpers. Until you end up with the theme some to Gilligan's Island or Eidelweiss in there instead, along with the wish that you never started trying to stop the original song in the first place. 'Just ring the bell on the big bagatelle, and you'll make all the coloured lights cascade.' Thanks Roy!

Irene               List_Addict

I finished reading DH Lawrence's Aaron's Rod last night. Once the stalwart of academia, he seems to have lost favour more recently with the literary world. (I did five years of literature at uni without a sniff of Lawrence.) It is most likely to do with his archaic attitude to women. This is the first Lawrence I have read since my course and it is a lot more obvious now. As is the Freudian and Nietzschian influence which I wasn't really expecting to see, but which make sense for any thinker writing in the beginning of the twentieth century and watching the world change irrevocably--even DH. Just have a look, from the Freudian point of view for example, at the whole 'rod' thing. He abandons the suffocating woman to be alone in the world with his rod. Hey, it looks like a flute and it plays like a flute, but we all know what a metaphor is about. And he works out his flute doesn't work out with other women either. In the end his self discovery needs to come with the breaking of the flute, a separation, as it were, from the driver of the masses (or the herd as Nietzsche would put it)--sexuality. Basically it did all get a little deeply philosophical in some strange ways. I did like one quote where he spoke about becominng truly one's self as a dandelion unfolding itself as a dandelion and not a stick of celery. I thought it was a nice image. Recommend it? Mmm, it is probably more a feeling of obligation to what is, regardless of academia's current standpoint, still a classic writer, rather than enjoyment as such.


The Outfit
Dress/Dressing gown: Op-shopped
Belt: Op-shopped
Shoes: Irregular Choice


Photographer de Jour: V——


Who wore it better?

Getting linky today with:

pleated poppy






>

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Day 148: Mad Cow

My dad just asked me if I was going to bring him home a tie from Thailand. It's a dad thing, isn't it? But I did, in my post twenty-minutes-sleep-since-yesterday stupor, think he meant a Thai. It didn't make sense that he didn't work any more and so didn't need one. Now I understand, and maybe a tie with a polo shirt isn't that good a look.

The blood bank try quite hard to guilt you/scare you into donating blood. I am happy to hand it over (and was even amused to read the other day that donating is a good way to reduce excess iron in your blood--just give it to someone else to dilute with theirs), but they have all these fussy rules about tattoos and communicable diseases and having lived in the United Kingdom for more than a week and a half in the early nineties. I don't have a communicable disease. Surely, after all this time, they would have found a way to find out if you have mad cow disease from living in the UK. One of the most ironic moments of my life was when the UK let me donate blood. I suppose every who lives in the UK, and is old enough, lived in the UK in the early nineties and so they would be mad cows too. It wouldn't really matter if you got tainted blood. It's just the rest of the world that is fussy.

List_Addict               Irene

Mine is the only dog in the world who has a kennel every where. She likes coverage. At home the kennel is in the lounge room. It is like an envelope in an envelope. At the moment we are running her down the peninsula to stay with her cousins and the kennel is in the back seat. She is asleep in the kennel in the car. An envelope in an envelope. I am not sure how she is going to cope with being in a kennel outside for the next week, acting and being like a dog. It will possibly be a little demeaning for her. Poor little person. Am I a bad mother?


The Outfit
Shirt: Op-shopped
Tie: Op-shopped
Skirt: Op-shopped
Shoes: Irregular Choice


Photographer de Jour: B——


Who wore it better?

Putting a link on with:

Real Girl Style Link Up


and



and

STYLELIXIR Style Sessions

Monday, May 27, 2013

Day 147: They're Listening ...

My Blogger account won't let me into itself on one of the computers at work. My partly paranoid mind thinks that is because I stated on here the other day that I had started reading a book called Play to Kill. That book is about hackers. You see where I am going? They think I am in cahoots. They think I am a hacker. They have no idea that I have no idea what I am doing on a computer—which is probably why I can't make the other computer work. Let me really jeopardise all my computer access opportunities by saying I always did wish I could be a covert operative. For the other side. A good other side. Like the French Foreign Legion perhaps. If you are a covert operative for the same side it seems too much like spying. And plus, here in Oz, it means you have to live in Canberra. And Canberra is a too cold, too hot, hole in the ground, too far from the sea. Is that too harsh? And now I see on the news that the building plans for the corporation of covert operative's new headquarters in Oz (I'm not going to say the name in order to minimise red-flags—I wonder if 'red-flags' is a red-flag?) have been compromised. I reckon my access to the other work computer will be gone by midday.

List_Addict               Irene

In two days I will be going to Thailand. Everyday I will blog about the cocktails I drank, the massages I endured (love a crazy, stretchy, bendy Thai massage) and the books I read. It will be very, very boring. If you would prefer to read about exotic travels and hair-raising adventures and the dogged determination of bad weather to get in the way. Or to learn about the history and culture and people, and lots and lots and lots about food, in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Albania and F.Y.R.O Macedonia. Then I cannot recommend highly enough the witty, entertaining and insightful blog that belongs to my best buddy and errant (or just downright AWOL) photographer B——. Check it out here. And you can subscribe for updates. You'll be glad you did.


The Outfit
Under Dress: Op-shopped
Over Dress: Op-shopped
Shrug: Op-shopped
Shoes: Irregular Choice


Photographer de Jour: V——


Who wore it better?

Getting linky today with:
Thrifters Anonymous

and
Join us! Click the Spotlight

and
stillbeingmolly

and
DCinStyle

Sunday, May 26, 2013

Day 146: Exuberance is Beauty—William Blake, Poet

Most eyelashes are better than mine. I'm okay with it. That is just the way it is. I envy amazing ones; I'm only human. I got extentions once—in Mexico City; I don't think they were the best and I really should try it here at home (although I know it will cost a whole lot more). Three times (last week) I wore falsies. One day in particular I wore them for about twelve hours and they made me want to rub my eyelids off. But today I saw what is arguably the best set of eyelashes I have ever seen in my entire life. Ever. On a secretary bird (Sagittarius Serpentarius). Have a look here—sensational. And here. And that hair-do is quite enviable too. Before today I had never heard of a secretary bird. They're bizarre. Basically a bird-of-prey on stilts. And their weapon of choice is a fast and furious stomping motion. Until you are dead beyond a doubt. And then a couple of more stomps. When you see this in action (it would be on You-Tube somewhere) it is hard to discern if it is cleverness or extreme paranoia. And then it looks at you with those lashes and how could you ever think it was a complete nutter? Eyelashes have a powerful effect. I really do need to get some.

List_Addict               Irene

I'm happy to soon be giving up Lookbook (I think I'll just not bother after I get back from my hols—I am not willing to put in whatever it must take to be one of the 'seen' people). I am going to go back to Pinterest—more variety. But I do see one item of clothing on Lookbook all the time. It makes me wonder what is so special about it that lots and lots and lots of people are happy to be seen in the same thing as lots and lots and lots of other people. I know that it's a manufacturer's dream, and arguably the 'point' of fashion, but isn't there a fine line between fashion and individuality that, I was sort of under the impression, people (especially those who blog/post/pin their OOTD's*) don't really want to cross. I must be wrong. The item is the Zara Asymmetric Skort. Um, yep. It's okay, but why is it so popular? The only other things I see with any regularity are the Celine, Paris t-shirt (and, I see, it costs forty dollars! Do people actually pay forty dollars for a t-shirt?) and the Moschino belt (and two ninety-five for a belt!? My fascist neighbours in their two-hundred and eighty grand cars and their tasteless house probably would). Both are also items of considerable blah-ness (sorry to anyone who doesn't think so, but, hey, my blog, my opinion—you can give yours in the comments.) Maybe it is just that they are distict. They stand out and so seem prolific. But you can stand out without wearing the same thing as everyone else. The one good thing about Lookbook is finding a couple of people who do just that. I'll be taking their links with me when I leave. Have a squizz: Pandora; the amazing Macademian Girl; Voila Meghan; Nora, the molecular biologist; and; the inspiring Girl with the Flower. Ooh, I just had my first 'High Five'.

* This, surprisingly, took me a long time to work out: Outfit Of The Day.


The Outfit
Sailor's Shirt: Op-shopped
Cardigan: Op-shopped
Skirt: Op-shopped
Shoes: Op-shopped (a big thing for me: thrifted shoes usually feeak-me-out!)


Photographer de Jour: V——


Who wore it better?

Linky today with:


Saturday, May 25, 2013

Day 145: Maybe We Can Eventually Make Language a Complete Impediment to Understanding

For my Mother ....

After a conversation regarding an unfortunate bicycle accident and its consequential twelve point solution to a contraceptive issue, my mother verbed her noun, and then dared me to use it here. This is the dare. This is the word: vasectomise. We brainstormed other ways to use it beside the obvious. For example, can you vasectomise the streets around you in order to have a street party? My theory is that if you can't do the real thing for a party (in your pants), only to open everything up again the next day to normal traffic, then you can't do it for the street party either. The 'street' analogy only works for the sort of street they close permanently, like, for example, when they build a freeway and the street that used to go that way doesn't make it to being an exit. It gets vasectomised.

Irene               List_Addict

'Ways of thinking' have a great potential to be vasectomised as well. As an example: 'I used to think that people who owned cats were a little crazy, but since adopting Fluffsticks from the pound, I have vasectomised that way of thinking.' The english language is not short of words and so for pratical closures of things that were once open it is possibly redundant, unless we are talking about sperm ducts, but as a metaphor I think it is quite useable and full of poetic(?) nuance.

P.S: Title of this blog is a quote from Calvin and Hobbs.


The Outfit
Chain Mail Top: Op-shopped
Cardigan: Op-shopped
Jeans: Target
Scarf: Op-shopped
Shoes: Swedish Hasbeens


Photographer de Jour: Moi


Who wore it better?

Making friends today with:

Life in a Break Down
and

Friday, May 24, 2013

Day 144: Eat Like a Caveman; Run Like a Caveman

Most people will be glad to hear that I finished Primal Body, Primal Mind today—all about a further stretching of, and scientific look at, the Paleo Diet. S—— will be happy because she (finally) gets her book back. If I can give you one piece of advice, it would be this: do not lend me a book. I just randomly picked up a book at work today and started reading it. It's not like I don't already have a million books on the go (see here and then take away Primal Body, Primal Mind, and add Play to Kill by PJ Tracy (a mother and daughter writing team?)). So lending me a book means your book is one of many and will not come back to you in the normal time it takes to read a book. I even made an exception with this one and prioritised reading of it above others. It was still a slow return. Everyone else will be relieved because, hopefully, conversations with me will no longer have wildly disconnected references to this book. No more conversations about cricket (coz I have lots of those) suddenly segwaying into why antacid actually perpetuates heartburn by lowering the natural acidity of the stomach and leaving that undigestable mass of dinner further undigestable because there isn't enough acid. They will also not have to listen to me saying how bad carbs are while we all eat cake. There may be some hangover people, but I think you are mostly in the clear.

List_Addict               Irene

Oh, but before I go. In basic-speak, here is the pretext of what I will be trying to take away from this book. One: far, far fewer glutens and carbs. I would love to say, like she wants you to, that I will give them all up, but it is a hard call. May try a de-tox for a couple of weeks when we get back from Thailand. (I'll warn you when to stay away.) See if that helps. The theory is that if you can get rid of all the glutens and sugar-producers, then your cells derive energy from the healthy fats you replace them with. Healthy fats in the right amounts, apparently, are a much healthier and life sustaining energy source. They help the guiding hormone leptin to control all the systems in your body for a better feeling, longer living body, and mind. Two: grass fed meats, wild caught fish and grass fed butter. No point giving up carbs only to put them back in through animals that eat carbs. Theoretically these types of products will be much healthier than mass produced, getting-a-consumer-focused animal products. Three: supplementing, with highest quality products, the nutrients that are missing from produce grown in depleted soils. Four (and by far the favourite idea): short bursts only of anaerobic exercise. Nora tells me that too much exercise is actually not good for you, and too much aerobic exercise is damaging to muscle. You have to think like a caveman. Eat like a caveman, don't eat what wouldn't have been around when the caveman was (like MacDonalds and high fructose corn syrup—and don't let me even start on the latter), and exercise like a caveman (walk everywhere and occasionally run like hell to get away from a mammoth, or drag the full carcass of the mastodon you just clubbed back to the cave). Simple theories. Let's see how we go. Paleo-prattler out!


The Outfit
Dress: Op-shopped (can you tell from the creases that I fell asleep on the couch before the photo shoot?)
Jumper: Op-shopped
Belt: Op-shopped
Tights: Retail
Shoes: Handmade (by me!)


Photographer de Jour: Moi


Who wore it better?

Sharing the Friday love with:



and

and

Lena B, Actually

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Day 143: A Smaller Suitcase

A beautiful electric blue Samsonite B'Lite Fresh found its way into my life today, courtesy of the seemingly bottom-less pocketed boy (I do know those pockets do have bottoms, despite all evidence against). In the past I have restricted the size of my bags in order to control the amount of stuff I take away with me. You know how it is—have bag, will fill. I am a little nervous of what I will take with me. For example, there is now no excuse as to taking my very large and voluminous kaftan to Thailand, just because I can. I could probably take the skates I wore with them here too! Don't get me wrong. I love it. And it will mean I can go to the States later in the year with an empty bag and come back with a full one, with only another three parcels sent back with newly thrifted items instead of four. What is does seem to highlight for me though, is a lack of naturally occuring self-control.

List_Addict               Irene

I have more shoes than fit on a shelf, more clothes than I can transfer from my washing basket to my cupboard, more books than I can read in a lifetime (especially at the current rate of none per ever, or something numerically similar). But, and I do feel a little ashamed, I don't really see any reason to stop getting more. I don't spend all my wages on these things—some people do. I give to charity every month. I buy the majority of my clothing from charity stores which both benefits the charities and assists with the reduction of waste (possibly in the same percentage as my reading rate, but it's a small difference). And I don't have a legacy—dependants, assets, responsibilities (within reason). And, ultimately, I probably don't need to justify myself. But this thing, this same thing is possibly what is behind the one other thing that I always want more of—biscuits. It sounds flippant, but I am serious here. I could probably do what I just did then with shoes, thrifting and books—find the justifications, see the lack of any real harm (except the physical which I manage to smooth over in my mind)—but maybe, in order to control this thing I need to find the equivalent of a smaller suitcase. You use the tools that work. If fabulous self control is not one of mine, I just have to work out how I can have less room to pack stuff (biscuits and sweet loveliness' of all kinds) in.


The Outfit
Jumper: Op-shopped
Skirt: Op-shopped
Tights: Retail (Myers or David Jones)
Necklace: CCJJSS
Shoes: Irregular Choice


Photographer de Jour: Moi


Who wore it better?

Doing the link-in love-in today with:

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Day 142: On The Selfie and Its Influence

I often see bloggers lamenting, praising, cursing or extolling the selfie. More on the negative though? No? I myself am a little over the selfie. If I have to be honest with myself. But instead of taking that cavelier and calm approach to this fact, I used a very broken night of sleep (Lollii has re-discovered the winter joy of being under the blankets, but insists on going in and out about three million times a night; she is incapable of doing that herself though and so face-stares me from a millimeter away until I wake up and let her in—if puppy-murder didn't leave you bereft without your puppy, I may have looked into it last night (not really)) as an excuse to completely melt down at my poor photographer-de-jour (good one, meltdown about selfies on a day when you don't have to do one) about how depressed I am about selfies and taking them in the kitchen with its horrible black wire (I took three in there!). Okay, it wasn't my most rational moment. The poor boy ended up driving me through industrial estates when he should have been napping for night shift, in order to find somewhere with light. The selfie lacks something the second-person photo has. I don't know what it is. The hardest thing about this blog is that, as a fiercely independent (read 'loner', 'recluse' or something similar) person, I am so reliant on others to make this blog as good as I can make it. (I wish I had another me; and then for a million other reasons I am so glad I don't.) It is a lesson in humility that I don't think I am learning very well. I do appreciate you my lovely photographers. I just wish you could give up your normal lives and willingly devote yourselves to just this task. Too much?

List_Addict               Irene

Am I too old? I don't understand social media. And it all moves too quickly for me. There is a new thing now. The Shelf. It's Pinterest for shopping. What is Pinterest for then? Just looking? Wishing? And The Shelf is your wishes come true? If you have enough money? I now have one shelf, with one item. I suppose if I was a proper fashion blogger it would make for a handy way to show others where can get your stuff, or make those outfit boards. When I started this particular project at the beginning of the year I became more aware than I had been before about what an industry blogging is. I was blissfully unaware. No more. The Shelf is another blogging opportunity. Like Lookbook. I am not sure if I can be bothered being that kind of a blogger. I don't think I have the time! Obscurity, you and I are going to be friends for quite some time—let me show you my shelf, oh, and my lookbook. P.S: I think both my shelf and my lookbook will be gone by the time I get back from holidays.


The Outfit
Shirt: Howard Showers
Dress: Op-shopped, Vintage Hawaiian cross over in delightful seventies polyester!
Belt: Retail
Tights: Retail
Boots: Irregular Choice


Photographer de Jour: V——


Who wore it better?

Getting linky today with:

pleated poppy






>

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Day 141: My Name is Charlie, And I Am a Book Addict

Today was meant to be my first participation in the Literary Junkies Book Club Twitter party to discuss this month's book Diamond in the Rough: A Memoir, by Shawn Colvin. I don't know what happened. It was a combination of coming off night shift, time-differences and the lack of energy to work them out, and, most importantly, two little things about the book itself. One: I didn't finish it in time. Two: I wasn't sure I had anything to say about it. Confession: I'm not a fan of memoirs. Confession: I was thinking book club would be like being at Uni, when really, I imagine, it's simply a chance for people to get to know each other and have a chat about a book that they may not normally have read. It doesn't have to be backed by theorists and foot-noted—even though there is nothing I like more than taking theorists out for a run to see what they can do. I tried to have a look at what happened on the Twitter party, but as usual I am a Twitter twit and can't work it out. I've just hit the one-click purchase on next month's book, The Silver Linings Playbook by Matthew Quick, and, having seen and enjoyed the movie, I am looking forward to, and optimistic that, this text will have so much more that I can talk about. If I can now just work out the Twitter thing and the time-difference, I will be there. Until then I'm linking into the Junkie's May link-up party.

Irene               List_Addict

Q: What are you currently reading? Tell us about it.

A: I have a pile (explained here). In the same way that I am unable to buy just one pair of shoes, rent just one movie or borrow just one book from a library (or, in recent times, buy just one), I am also unable to read just one book at a time. (I call it an 'admiration of variety'; others may call it an attention deficiency.) Currently the pile is out of control. I'll give you the names, but—although I could theoretically do it—I will not even start to 'tell you about it'. We would be here until tomorrow. Here goes: Aaron's Rod; Bones are Forever; The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (again); 1Q84: Books 1 and 2; Don Quixote; War and Peace; David Copperfield; This Side of Paradise; The Quiet American (those make up the Classics corner), Antigone (in French, wanker), Primal Body, Primal Mind; Turn of the Century; The Lotus Eaters; Up Country; The Secret Teachings of All Ages; The Book of Secrets; Midwinter Sacrifice; Diamond in the Rough (of course); The Bat; and; The Age of Chivalry. Phew! Mad. Just mad.

Q: Summer (in the Northern Hemisphere) and my favourite thing to fantazise is liying in hammock with a good book. What are your top three fave 'summer' reads?

A: In terms of books I would read again. I suppose the HP's would be top of the list. I have been through all seven Harry Potters four or five times. I am reading the Millenium series again at the moment, and I would consider doing the Hunger Games again. But, otherwise. I would rather go forward to try and get some of the other's done. The Library of Congress adds eleven thousand things to it's collection every day—mostly, I would imagine, books. There are untold numbers of books for me to try and get to before the end. The big end, not Summer.

Q: What are your top three summer 'to reads'?

A: Maybe I will answer this by going on-line now and choosing three books for my psuedo-summer (tropical holiday in a week's time). Back in a tick and I will let you know what I got. Typical. I got four: Ann Funder's, All that I Am; Daniel Keyes', Flowers for Algernon, The Girl on the Stairs: A Masterful Psychological Thriller by Louise Welsh; and; George RR Martin's The Game of Thrones. Reasons in order: loved Stasiland; always wanted to; recommended (but why do authors feel this need to explain what it is you are holding in your hand; every book I looked at was subtitled 'A Novel'. It was borderline annoying.); societal pressure.

Q: What book do you wish they would make into a movie?

A: I know it is a possibility already, but I had also heard that due to the first one not doing so well, the second and third Americanised Millenium movies where not a guaranteed go-ahead. I would prefer they did. I would like to spend time comparing them to the Swedish. And more Daniel Craig is never a bad thing.

Q: Has your favourite author published a book lately or going to publish a book soon. Tell us about it.

A: I saw an interview yesterday with Ian Rankin. I love him. He is so down to earth. I have the series ready to go for when (if ever) I get through the Reichs' series (stop writing so quickly already!!), and so I haven't actually read any of them. But I get a good feeling, and an even better one after seeing him. So I am really excited he has brought Rebus back. Standing in Another Man's Grave. I should get to it sometime in the next ten years.


The Outfit
Dress: Op-shopped
Jacket: Op-shopped
Tights: Macy's, Times Square
Shoes: Irregular Choice


Photographer de Jour: V——


Who wore it better?

Putting a link on with:

Real Girl Style Link Up


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STYLELIXIR Style Sessions

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Pink Heels Pink Truck